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LEED/Sustainability Projects

Jefferson Green @ Journal Center

This 85,000sf office building was designed to use 45% less energy and 30% less water than a typical office building, as well as incorporate a variety of low-emitting, recycled, and regional materials. Key sustainable features include an underfloor air distribution system, evaporative cooling, operable windows, extensive daylighting and views, and low-flow plumbing fixtures. The building has achieved a rare double LEED Gold certification. The project was awarded Gold under LEED for Core and Shell (LEED-CS) in March 2007, and Gold under LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) in June 2007. EPA awarded Jefferson Green an Energy Star in June 2008 based on actual energy performance using data from utility bills. Jefferson Green’s rating of 99 places it in the top 1% of buildings in the nation for energy performance.

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UNLV Science, Engineering and Technology Building

This 4-story, 205,000sf facility is one of the largest, and greenest, research facilities of its kind in the country. The facility is expected to achieve a LEED Silver rating from the US Green Building Council in recognition of its sustainable features. The design focused on sustainability, creating collaborative working environments and flexible laboratory spaces, and innovative technology. Key sustainable features include low water use landscaping, low flow plumbing fixtures, reuse of laboratory rejection water, an efficient building envelope, and a variety of low-emitting, recycled, and regionally manufactured materials. The SET building is expected to use 25% less energy and 40% less water than a typical lab building while creating a healthy indoor environment.

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Kayenta Health Center

This 180,000sf facility on the Navajo Nation focuses primarily on outpatient care, with a small nursing unit and emergency department. The building is designed to respond to the dramatic views of Monument Valley, the cultural context of Navajo culture, and the sustainable goals of the Indian Health Service (IHS). The Kayenta Health Center is pursuing LEED Certification with a focus on energy and water conservation and providing an indoor environment that promotes healing.

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Commercial Projects

ABQ Uptown

This ongoing project in the heart of Albuquerque’s Uptown business and retail district creates a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use city neighborhood on a vacant 20-acre brownfield site between two large retail malls. Known as ABQ Uptown, the development has the texture and density of a traditional downtown, melding lifestyle, retail, multifamily housing, offices, entertainment, restaurants, a hotel and a corner grocery store, all served by plazas, pedestrian corridors, and convenient on and off-street parking.

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BlueCross BlueShield Office Building

Focused on developing a healthy work environment for its employees, the BCBS goals included the desire for a sustainable design approach. With natural day lighting, flexibility of office layouts, and power and data distribution systems among the major design considerations, the building is designed to take advantage of its prominent, highly visible location along the interstate and dramatic views of the Sandia Mountains to the east.

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Hotel Albuquerque at Old Town

This project involved extensive renovations to the largest hotel in Old Town, one of the most popular tourist attractions in New Mexico. One of the owner’s primary goals was to add convention space and a ballroom in what was formerly an enclosed retail space adjacent to the hotel. The new ballroom is the largest in the state, designed and furnished in the same “Albuquerque Style” embodied by the renovated hotel. Other projects included the renovation of the original ballroom, creation of a new bar, new gardens, a swimming pool, and a wedding chapel.

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Jefferson Green @ Journal Center

Jefferson Green, D/P/S’s new office building, has set a new standard for sustainable design in New Mexico. It is the first LEED Gold commercial building in New Mexico, and the largest and most energy efficient LEED building in the state. Jefferson Green uses 30% less water and 45% less energy than a typical office building, and provides a healthy, comfortable environment for employees. Sustainable features include an underfloor air distribution system, advanced glazing and shading, operable windows, energy efficient lighting, low-flow plumbing fixtures, and a variety of recycled, regional, and low-emitting materials. Jefferson Green achieved LEED Gold certification under LEED-CS in March 2007 and LEED-CI in June of 2007.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

Mariposa Office Building

High Desert Development commissioned Dekker/Perich/Sabatini to design a “21st Century New Mexico landmark” to establish design guidelines for the town center of their new Mariposa community under development on 4,000 virgin acres northwest of Albuquerque. Simple form, a response to the site by optimal solar orientation, shading and views, natural day lighting and contrast of materials provides a fresh interpretation of the New Mexico vernacular and a strong sense of place, rooted in Anasazi tradition.

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Yates Petroleum Company Headquarters

Designed to respect the historic profile of Artesia’s Main Street while providing a fresh, contemporary image speaking to the company’s technological prowess and economic success, this 95,000sf, three-story facility provides functional workspace and employee amenities. A highly visible main entrance links the adjacent, existing company facilities with overhead, pedestrian bridges to augment the companies overall operations.

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Higher Education Projects

NMJC Western Heritage Center

This project was conceived as an outreach function of the New Mexico Junior College in Hobbs located on the campus northern boundary adjacent to the Lovington Highway. The project houses the Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame, The Western Heritage Museum, full theater, and flexible space for temporary museum installations. The built project is an expression of Hobbs itself, with a fully glazed oil derrick-inspired tower entry sequence, the use of limestone cladding and façade elements similar to those found in the area’s historic farm houses. The museum offers interpretive exhibits and routinely hosts community events such as concerts, museum talks, arts and crafts shows, and even rodeo events.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

UNLV Science, Engineering & Technology

The Science, Engineering & Technology Building will be located on the north campus of UNLV and will serve as the anchor to a future quad of science buildings. Once constructed, the building and its instrumentation will constitute an interactive environment designed to facilitate collaborative research in science and engineering. Since the future of science and engineering research is unpredictable, this building is equipped with dynamically allocated space that can easily be converted from one use to another, ensuring that today’s “wet” labs can readily become the “dry” labs of tomorrow.

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UNM Domenici Center for Health Sciences Education

This building was designed to facilitate multi-disciplinary interaction and collaboration between students, faculty, and the public. The design blurs the traditional boundaries of nursing, pharmacy, and medicine by providing shared teaching spaces. The facility includes a Clinical Performance Center where students learn to diagnose and treat illnesses through a combination of real patients, virtual reality teaching spaces and interactive mannequin simulations. Designed as a hub of activity for the Health Sciences Center, the building includes a food court, bookstore, health club, and central commons.

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UNR Knowledge Center

Designed as a library of the future compatible with the neo-Jeffersonian style of the university’s original campus, this building combines traditional library functions with technology classrooms, video-conferencing facilities and specialized computer labs. UNR has embraced the idea of the library as a comfortable space for both students and the public to spend long periods of time and the building features lounge areas, public meeting rooms, a café and a 13,000sf automated storage and retrieval system capable of providing 20 years of collection growth in a compact footprint.

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UNR Center for Molecular Medicine

The Facility is located on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, forming the northern edge of the University of Nevada School of Medicine complex. The facility will provide a University research laboratory, mouse vivarium, and clinical space for the private partners; The Whittemore Peterson Institute, Red Labs, and the Nevada Cancer Institute. The project is interdisciplinary in nature and will incorporate the fundamentals of sustainability and energy efficiency capable of achieving LEEDTM (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and meet the criteria set forth by Labs21. Campus context is reinforced and reinterpreted with the exterior cladding of this project. The existing campus brick is pulled into a skin where volumes and lighter glass planes push through and sometimes beyond it expressing and exposing interior functions creating an inviting and transparent building for both users and patients.

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K-12 Education Projects

Isleta Elementary School

Located on a hilltop site with 270 degree views, Isleta Elementary School was designed to replace the Isleta Pueblo’s existing school which was outdated and too small for the current population.  The new school reflects the Isleta culture, and many design features were incorporated to tie the site and the school back to the customs of the people.  Isleta Elementary accommodates over 300 students from kindergarten through sixth grade.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

Ernest Stapleton & Maggie M. Cordova Elementary Schools

Designing two new elementary schools in Rio Rancho presented an opportunity to make a statement about the identity of this young, growing city. Ernest Stapleton Elementary replaces an existing school campus on a nearby site that was comprised entirely of metal modular buildings. Maggie M. Cordova Elementary is an entirely new school that was designed in a rapidly growing area of the city. Both schools are identical in design and layout, but were given different color schemes and entry canopy designs to add unique individual character. The schools were designed to provide simple circulation and good daylighting for a population of 800 students.

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Tse’Yi’Gai High School

Tse Yi Gai high school is located in the heart of Chaco Canyon National Monument, which houses historic Anasazi Indian ruins.  The planning process included several members of the state’s archaeological department and historical commission to ensure that site disturbance was limited. The new facility accommodates 500 students, with expansion capabilities for up to 800.  Tse Yi Gai has new athletic facilities, as well as a campus of residential housing for the teachers to stay on site.

The project was constructed in four phases: Phase I included the main building and the classroom wing; Phase II involved the residential teacher housing; Phase III consisted of the sports field, and Phase IV will include the auditorium and music rooms.

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T’siya Elementary and Middle School

Located a mile north of the Pueblo of Zia on a mesa with a view of Sandia Peak, T’siya Elementary and Middle School replaces the Pueblo’s original K-6 school.  The new facility allows the Pueblo to accommodate 156 students up to the eighth grade. The materials and colors of the building, both inside and out, were chosen to recall the decoration of traditional Pueblo buildings. The design of the school centers on a circular plaza.  This outdoor space is used for community gatherings and dances, as well as an outdoor teaching area. The plaza divides the school into elementary school and middle school areas. Pre-kindergarten through fifth grade is located near the library, administration spaces and an elders’ room. This room is a place for tribal elders to teach the students about their culture and for bilingual education in English and Keres, the Pueblo’s native language.

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Valencia High School

The Los Lunas School district hired D/P/S in 1999 to begin the planning and design of a new career based high school facility that would eventually become a second high school for the district. The vision for this second high school was to integrate both technical and vocational instruction and college preparatory courses in a single, innovative academy. Valencia High School, previously named the Career Academy, needed to be constructed in several phases and remain completely operational throughout each phase. At completion, the school will house up to 1,500 students. The phasing plan was designed to work with the available PSCOC and bond funds and deliver a complete high school, at current PSFA adequacy standards, by the conclusion of phase 5.

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Healthcare Projects

Baptist St. Anthony's Hospital Expansion & Renovation

Dekker/Perich/Sabatini, teamed with Page & Associates Contractors, have completed a new, six-story tower addition with basement, penthouse, and bridges forming a dual “back-of-house” connections to the existing building at each patient floor. An existing one story area has also been renovated into a new, two-story addition providing a large, full feature conference center above much needed space for “in-place” expansion for Endoscopy. The tower provides 90 private patient rooms based on a “universal” design that can also be used as ICU rooms and “step-down” rooms depending on patient acuity. There is also an additional “shelled” floor for expansion of another 30 rooms. A new food court is located on the second floor taking advantage of the protective overhang of the floor above, with dining enclosed by full height glass walls and spacious outdoor decks overlooking the valley to the south and east.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

Ernest Healthcare

This hospital is another facility in the long list of projects Dekker/Perich/Sabatini has completed for Ernest Healthcare, Inc., a growing healthcare services company. The facility is freestanding, 40-bed long term acute care (LTAC) hospital that is approximately 50,000sf in size. All of our EHI hospitals are located primarily in underserved areas and provide care for patients recovering from stroke, heart attack, brain injury, spinal cord injury, orthopedic conditions, cancer, and pulmonary conditions. These facilities offer physical therapy, speech therapy, and psychiatric services that bridge an important gap in transitioning patients from acute care facilities back to home living. To accommodate long patient stays, these hospitals strive to maintain a friendly environment that promotes healing of the body, mind, and spirit.

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Kayenta Health Center

The Kayenta Health center is located on the Navajo Nation, in Kayenta, AZ, near the Four Corners region. The facility is a two-story, 182,000sf facility with a small (10 bed) nursing unit, and is primarily focused on outpatient care. The design for the building emphasizes a sensitive response to the site which offers outstanding views at the edge of Monument Valley, a rigorous reflection of the building’s programmatic requirements, and an integration of the cultural context, both of the Navajo (Diné) culture, as well as the operational culture and values of the staff and administration of the existing facility that will be replaced.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

Presbyterian Hospital East Expansion

This project personalized Presbyterian’s approach to healthcare delivery by bringing them closer to the goal of being an all-private bed hospital, while unifying a collection of buildings built over the last 40 to 50 years into a single campus. The East Expansion added three new floors over the existing East Tower of the hospital to house Labor and Delivery, Neonatal Intensive Care, Extended Care Nursery, Postpartum Recovery, Pediatric Intensive Care, Cardiac Care, Cardiovascular Intensive Care, and General Medical and Surgical Units.  

The addition and renovation was executed in three phases. Phase I involved infrastructure upgrades to the Central Plant and underground utilities to support the addition. Phase II involved a seismic upgrade of the existing East Tower lateral support system to meet current building codes and prepare for the lateral load imposed by the additional three stories. Lastly, Phase III was the addition itself and exterior modifications to the existing building skin.

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Presbyterian Hospital, Main Emergency Department

To meet a growing Emergency Room population, D/P/S was tasked to design a state-of-the-art Emergency Department that could treat a projected annual patient population of 80,000 as well decrease the length of patient stay. In order to complete this task, both the physical plant and emergency department operations had to be re-designed. Working closely with hospital administration, emergency department staff, and an operations consultant we were able to accomplish the task at hand.

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Presbyterian Health Services, Rio Rancho Medical Center

Patient care is more than trained medical staff using the latest equipment to make people well; it creates a healing environment that takes care of the body, mind, and soul of patients and their families. A variety of concepts are being employed to create a true healing environment for the patients and staff of the facility.

The first project phase is a 460,000sf building that houses 66 medical/surgical beds, 6 Intensive Care Unit beds, and a 12-bed Labor Delivery Recovery Postpartum unit. The Diagnostic and Treatment wing of the building is home to the emergency department, imaging, interventional services, and preparation and recovery. To allow staff to utilize their time with patients more efficiently, the facility also includes a fully integrated professional office building.  Future phases are planned for easy expansion to minimize disruption. At full expansion, the facility is designed to house a 385-bed facility to meet growing demands of Rio Rancho and West Albuquerque. 

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Healthcare Presentations

The Patient Room of The Future...

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Housing Projects

Old Albuquerque High School

The Albuquerque High School campus was closed in 1974 and abandoned to decay. In 1998, a master plan was developed to convert the Old Main (1914), Classroom Buildings (1937), and Gymnasium Building (1938) into 124 loft condominiums ranging in size from 500sf efficiencies to 1,900sf bi-level luxury town homes. The design team focused on retaining the architectural character of the original campus while looking to ignite interest in Albuquerque’s downtown potential. Following the success of the initial adaptive reuse phase, a new mixed-use infill component was added. Arno, Campus, City Market, and Copper Lofts offer 56 high-end living spaces with live/work plan options, allowing tenants to take advantage of a flourishing commercial area and vibrant entertainment district.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

The Fountains at Carlotta

To create a full service, age-in-place residential care facility for residents over age 65, this project involved adding multiple types of senior facilities to an existing center, including independent living homes, assisted living apartments, and Alzheimer beds.

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NM Tech Student Housing

Located on a gentle hillside overlooking the Manzano mountain range, this 144-bed student apartment complex is a combination of two- and three-story buildings designed to replicate and enhance the Spanish renaissance style of the campus located in central New Mexico.

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Sawmill Lofts

Sawmill Lofts is a 60-unit live-work loft-style housing complex within Arbolera de Vida, a community land trust located in Albuquerque’s historic Old Town. The concept for the project was to offer an affordable loft–type product that would appeal to residents and the area’s artist community. The housing was designed with direct community involvement and guidance from prospective artist residents. The result is well-lit spaces with the infrastructure, display opportunities, and flexibility required for artisans and others who desire a live-work type residence.

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Villa de San Felipe Apartments

This housing development played a major role in on-going revitalization efforts in downtown Albuquerque. Spanning three full city blocks, this complex consists of three three-story buildings, totaling 161 units and amenities such as a lap pool, hot tubs, a laundry room, secured covered parking, a workout room, community rooms, and outdoor spaces to attract a diverse, active workforce to this unique urban project.

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Landscape Design Projects

Arbolera de Vida Plaza

Arbolera de Vida Plaza is an award-winning public space on an urban infill, brownfield site that is an integral part of a model affordable housing project in an old Albuquerque neighborhood. The Plaza is the result of a public-privatepartnership between the City of Albuquerque and the grass-roots Sawmill Community Land Trust, a neighborhood advocacy group turned developer, who
is dedicated to bringing high quality affordable housing and economic activity to the Sawmill neighborhood.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

Artesia Gates

The small town of Artesia, New Mexico is undergoing a renaissance as a result of the Artesia Mainstreet organization’s community spirit, pride and initiative. The Artesia Gates project builds on Artesia’s effort to reconstruct their main street and bring new economic opportunity to downtown. 

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Fidelity Investments - Mesa del Sol

Fidelity Investments recent addition to the Albuquerque area is a 217,842 square foot office building on 24.8 acres on the north end of Mesa del Sol’s Innovation Park. The office will manage back-of-of?  ce functions for Fidelity and is expected to employ up to 1500 people.

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Juan Tabo Hills

This is a 26 acre project which involved designing an office/commercial complex and 158 unique residential units. The residential units are town homes with a contemporary flair of which there are four different elevations. The real challenge on this project was to maximize the unit count and still meeting the requirements of the City of Albuquerque as well as creating a good livable community.

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Mariposa Community Center

Mariposa Community Center is a new community social center featuring two swimming pools, an exercise room, and a café. The facility is another step toward achieving the Mariposa master plan goal of a sustainable and pedestrian-oriented community. The project has set a goal to achieve LEED Silver certification.

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Mesa del Sol Wireless Telecommunications Facility (WTF)

 
Cell towers do not have to be blights on our landscape.  Dekker/Perich/Sabatini has created an elegant solution to the quandary posed by cell towers: how to provide coverage with towers that contribute, rather than detract from the urban landscape.  Wireless telecommunication facilities (WTF) are familiar sights in our contemporary landscape and, at times, objects of intense public scrutiny.  Without adequate design consideration a WTF may encounter public opinion that may weaken public communication services. Dekker/Perich/Sabatini designed and assisted in the entitlement of a new Wireless Telecommunications Facility that courageously pushes the envelope of public infrastructure design.

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New Mexico Education Assistance Foundation

New Mexico Student Loans had out grown their existing facility.  Their vision was to build a new facility to house their corporate

offices, customer service, collections, and warehouse operations into one building.  The task Dekker/Perich/Sabatini was charged with was to design a building that could incorporate anticipated growth into the year 2010.

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St. Michael’s Blvd. Design / Re-development Project

The City of Santa Fe invited seven urban design firms to participate in a competition to envision a future for St. Michaels Boulevard. The extent of the redevelopment went from Cerrillos Rd to St Francis Dr. and included roadway, transit design and land use design.  

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Thornburg Office Complex

The landscape design at the Thornburg Office Complex is an expression of the push and pull that occurs between man and nature. The landscape devolves from a human interpretation of order near the building, to the natural order of the high desert toward the perimeter of the site. The design intent is to create an office campus  that appears to be engulfed by nature, while simultaneously collaborating with nature to create a sustainable facility. The project, which is pursuing LEED-NC Platinum certification, is located on a sloping site which has been organized into a series of ordered, clearly-defined terraced spaces that intuitively guide visitors to entrances and provide a contrast to the "randomness" of nature. Roof gardens provide attractive exterior areas for employees to experience the spectacular views of the surrounding landscape including the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The layered and patterned landscaping contributes to the complexity of the building elevation, designed by Ricardo Legorreta in association with DPS. 

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UNR Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center

The landscape design at the UNR Library reflects both the traditional campus and the nearby, ecological environments of the Great Basin Desert, Truckee Meadows, and the Sierra Nevada. The design enhances the connection between the indoors and outdoors, inspires learning and provides a usable space for both study and special activities in Reno’s often pleasant climate.

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Interior Design Projects

Avila Retail Spaces

The Avila Retail Development and Management Group has opened stores in Albuquerque, Phoenix, and Denver while working closely with D/P/S to theme them.

Earth Spirit stores are organic in form and specialize in the sale of jewelry and contemporary crafts. Features include a “river” of concrete floor colors, curved walls and display cases, and built-in nichos. Light tracks and jewel-like pendant spot fixtures illuminate merchandise in a backdrop of sage green, red, and purple. Fiesta Market stores emulate a New Mexico residence and feature indigenous foods and souvenirs. The design incorporates corrugated tin ceilings, wood beams and latillas, and southwestern display cases to recall an adobe home. The walls are painted with intense reds, yellows, and blues and include wall sconces of old New Mexican tin work.

Download Project Information Sheet Here

BlueCross BlueShield Office Building

Dekker/Perich/Sabatini, in collaboration with ZPD+A architects, designed this headquarters focused on the long term needs of BlueCross/BlueShield. With sustainable principles to save energy and the desire to provide highly efficient and healthy work space for the recruitment and retention of its employees, the design of this facility incorporates natural day lighting, the use of non-toxic and renewable materials, and the provision of clean air as elements in its design. Flexibility of office layouts and power and data distribution systems were among the major functional consideration for the facility. By being focused on the future, characterized by strong identity, the provision of state-of-the-art work space and support, and sustainable design strategies, this facility is an important role model for new commercial office buildings and a highly visible corporate identity to BlueCross/BlueShield in New Mexico.

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ConocoPhillips San Juan Office Building

ConocoPhillips recognized the need for a space that allowed its people to work better – more effectively, more efficiently, and more comfortably – when it designed its field headquarters in Farmington, New Mexico. Dekker/Perich/Sabatini and its multi-disciplined team were hired to provide comprehensive services, including facility programming, architecture, engineering, interior design, and complete furniture procurement. The design of the project was developed from the inside out with office space organized around a central atrium to provide visibility from floor to floor and offering daylight to all work areas. Casual meeting areas located at key vertical and horizontal intersections to encourage interaction among employees. Interior and exterior design elements combine contemporary materials and detailing. The project successfully addressed the need for functional and flexible office space with an image that speaks to a progressive, environmentally responsive corporate owner.

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Jefferson Green @ Journal Center

The design of this LEED Gold, three-story, 85,000sf office building focused on incorporating meaningful sustainable features into a market-rate speculative office building in order to use less water and energy than a typical office building. The team focused on selecting design strategies that would enhance the daily experience of building occupants, support local businesses, and make financial sense in terms of initial investment and operational savings. The building incorporates large quantities of recycled and regional materials as well as low-VOC interior materials to promote material conservation and occupant health. Urea formaldehyde free composite wood was used and low-emitting paints, sealants, adhesives, and carpets were selected to reduce chemical off-gassing. Rooms for the collection and storage of recyclables were also provided on each floor to encourage building occupants to recycle. This building is a testament that sustainability can be a beautifully integrated component in a successful design.

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Radiology Associates of Albuquerque

Radiology Associates of Albuquerque is a growing imaging practice with consolidated clinical and administrative functions. Directly off of the lobby are the clinical spaces, the Women’s Imaging Center and a General Radiation area, which are distinctly different in look and feel with the former a comfortable and engaging space and the latter more high-tech in feel. Centralized technician space creates efficiency for staff and allows for shared support spaces. The administrative area is located away from the clinical area due to the need for limited public access with a large break room and board room that may be combined by opening sliding glass doors. The project successfully challenges the traditional concept of a medical office by combining an atmosphere that reinforces the technology associated with this type of practice while providing a comfortable and engaging environment for patients.

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UNM Domenici Health Sciences Center

Designed as a multi-disciplinary, medical education facility, The Domenici Center at the University of New Mexico is a collaborative learning environment for students, faculty, and staff.

A primary consideration of the design was to create a space that would not only function as a place in which learning would occur, but one that would actively affect the learning environment. Through direct communication with the various user-groups and knowledge gained through research on learning environments, this facility considers both the physical and social needs of the inhabitants. The design of the facility encourages interaction and collaboration in formal and informal areas through access to natural light, acoustics, material specifications, and furniture selections that allow flexibility.

With a clear project vision and continual communication with the client throughout design and construction, the project reached a successful conclusion as a well-integrated addition into the north campus of the University of New Mexico.

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Structural Projects

BlueCross BlueShield Office Building

The primary structure of the 116,000sf, four-story BlueCross BlueShield headquarters building consists of steel framing with exposed and non-exposed lateral bracing in each principal direction to resist earthquake and wind loads. Even though the building had a complex geometrical shape, the consistent structural grid eliminated costly structural discontinuities. Since the structural steel system was exposed in various locations throughout the building, it required closer coordination with the architectural, mechanical, and electrical details to ensure the design intent was obtained. Key elements of the BlueCross BlueShield building are exposed framing at the fourth floor with simulated castellated beams, concealed braced frame connections at the exposed braces, cantilevered coped steel beams at the roof edge to extend sun protection and lighten the edge are among a few around the headquarters for BlueCross/BlueShield.

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Baptist St. Anthony's Hospital

The structure of this project consists of a six-story concrete tower addition connected to an adjacent new structural steel tower via a multi-level pedestrian bridge. One of the particular structural challenges included achieving a very limited floor to floor height to match the existing hospital floor to floor height. The six-story main building was designed for two additional levels to be constructed at a future date. The steel portion of the project was also designed for two additional stories as well as significant horizontal expansion of the floor plate. The six-level pedestrian bridge connecting the new addition to the original hospital tower was designed by stacking and interconnecting story-deep steel trusses, allowing for greatly simplified steel erection.

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Chief Manuelito Middle School

The two-story Chief Manuelito Middle School project consists of a foundation composed of auger-cast piers and grade beams. The lateral system is primarily exterior ordinary, reinforced masonry shear walls in every part of building excluding the gymnasium, where concentric steel braced frames were utilized. Our design objective was to utilize single-wythe eight inch masonry block which drove the need for a steel lateral system in the gymnasium since the height was above thirty feet. Several of the more challenging structural elements on the Chief Manuelito project were a cantilevered monoslope roof at the gymnasium, twenty foot high CMU wainscot wall surrounding the gymnasium and diagonal/multi-directional framing at the canopies.

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Department of Employment, Training & Rehabilitation

A structural steel braced frame structure was chosen for this two-story office building for economic reasons as well as to provide a very stiff structural frame. A sloping “butterfly” roof structure with long double-cantilevered ends was a particularly challenging structural element. An elevated pedestrian bridge and exterior exit stair supported by large architectural concrete piers connects the two building wings. This structure provides an elegant means for security fencing of the central courtyard and entry lobby.

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Jefferson Green @ Journal Center

This 85,000sf, three-story steel framed office building is situated in an area with soft soils that yielded an IBC Site Class D. This drove the structure into stringent Seismic Design Category D. After studying several lateral bracing schemes, the design team and general contractor settled on a creative use of infill concrete shearwalls with steel columns as boundary elements. This allowed the entire steel frame to be erected prior to casting the shearwalls, minimizing impact on the construction schedule. These shearwalls and much of the structural steel framing are exposed architecturally in the building lobby and tenant spaces.

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